PRC Archives: Which was that previous church – and which is this new one?

Last week in our PRC archives post we featured an old PR church building of a current congregation. And I am not sure if that one was too difficult to guess, or if you are bored with these pictures, or just plain busy with other things, but NO ONE even ventured a guess! I am disappointed! :(

PRYPsConv-21st-Loveland-1961-1_Page_1

But whatever the case may have been, I am over it and ready to give you the answer to last week’s mystery photo and to give you a new one. And, in fact, I have some additional pictures that go with the item of last week. The church building in last week’s post was Loveland, CO PRC, and the picture of it came out of the 21st Annual PR Young People’s Convention booklet. The YP’s Convention that year ran from August 22-24, 1961. I didn’t go that year, because they wouldn’t accept three-year olds :)

But I know a lot of people who did, because I have some of their pictures from the rest of the Convention booklet! Was it ever fun looking at these! So much fun that I decided to scan a few and share the fun! Want to see some Hubers and Griess and Kuipers in their younger days? Take a look below! And the picture of the Fed Board president that year? Priceless! He’s my old high school teacher, and a mighty fine looking young chap, flat-top and all! Check this out! (Click on the images to enlarge.)

PRYPsConv-21st-Loveland-1961-2_Page_1

And what about some of the Convention speakers that year of 1961? Well, Rev.Herman Hoeksema was the first, and you’ve seen many pictures of him. But what about a very young Rev.Homer Hoeksema and a Rev.Herman Veldman in his prime? Then check out this page from the booklet!

PRYPsConv-21st-Loveland-1961-3_Page_1

Now, if you are ready to try and guess another former church building, here’s one for you, which we will identify next week in case you don’t get it. But I know there are people out there who know it!

Mystery PRChurch-#2_Page_1

Man of Sorrows – Hallelujah, What a Savior – CCHS Concert Choir

Hallelujah, What a Savior. CCHS Concert Choir – YouTube.

Since Pastor A.Begg quoted from the hymn “Man of Sorrows” (“Hallelujah, What a Savior!”) in the sermon from which I quoted in the previous post, I also post this arrangement of this hymn sung by the Concert Choir of Covenant Christian High School in Grand Rapids, MI. This was part of their November 2012 concert, with the video recording made by Nick Kleyn.

Here are the lyrics to the hymn as originally written by Philip Bliss (1875):

  1. 1. “Man of Sorrows!” what a name For the Son of God, who came Ruined sinners to reclaim. Hallelujah! What a Savior!

  2. 2. Bearing shame and scoffing rude, In my place condemned He stood; Sealed my pardon with His blood. Hallelujah! What a Savior!

  3. 3. Guilty, vile, and helpless we; Spotless Lamb of God was He; “Full atonement!” can it be? Hallelujah! What a Savior!

  4. 4. Lifted up was He to die; “It is finished!” was His cry; Now in Heav’n exalted high. Hallelujah! What a Savior!

  5. 5. When He comes, our glorious King, All His ransomed home to bring, Then anew His song we’ll sing: Hallelujah! What a Savior!

▶ How Deep the Father’s Love For Us – Covenant CHS Chamber Singers

▶ How Deep the Father’s Love For Us. CCHS Chamber Singers. – YouTube.

And for our meditation on the passion of Christ through music today we post this video of the Covenant Christian HS Chamber Choir performing “How Deep the Father’s Love for Us” at their November 2013 concert held in Calvin College’s Covenant Fine Arts Center (compliments of Nick Kleyn).

The words to this contemporary hymn are as follows:

“How Deep The Father’s Love For Us” was written by Stuart Christopher Townend.

How deep the Father’s love for us
How vast beyond all measure
That He should give His only Son
And make a wretch His treasure

How great the pain of searing loss
The Father turns His face away
As wounds which mar the chosen One
Bring many sons to glory

Behold the Man upon a cross
My sin upon His shoulders
Ashamed I hear my mocking voice
Call out among the scoffers

It was my sin that held Him there
Until it was accomplished
His dying breath has brought me life
I know that it is finished

I will not boast in anything
No gifts, no power, no wisdom
But I will boast in Jesus Christ
His death and resurrection

Why should I gain from His reward?
I cannot give an answer
But this I know with all my heart
His wounds have paid my ransom



Read more: Owl City – How Deep The Father’s Love For Us Lyrics | MetroLyrics 

A Library for the Young People’s Society (2) – Rev.R.C.Harbach

A couple of weeks ago I first referenced an older article by Rev.Robert C. Harbach in the Beacon Lights in which he encouraged each Young People’s Society to start its own library (Vol.16, No.7 – Sept.1956). And I pointed out that this was the second time I had come across such an idea. Rev.H.Hoeksema had give the same encouragement to CRC young people when  he was editor of The Young Calvinist.

YPsLibraryI find this concept interesting and inviting, and part of my purpose in refering to these old articles is to revive the idea among our young people. You are the rising generation, and we need a fresh generation of readers who will continue the good Reformed-Christian tradition of reading well. Not merely for your own spiritual growth and good, but also for the spirital growth and good of the church of Christ of which you are a part.

As we saw last time, while Rev.R.Harbach was convinced that such a beginning library should have “the fundamentals” of the Christian faith in it, he believed the fundamental principle on which this library should be based is the absolute sovereignty of God. Thus it would be a  Reformed library. And Rev.Harbach gave some practical suggestions for what books to begin to place in such a library too. Today we quote a portion of that part of his article.

But there are other volumes which take on a more Reformed coloring, such as, ‘The Reformed Doctrine of Predestination’ by Loraine Boettner, and ‘Reformed Evangelism’ (Baker). The former should be read if at all possible in connection with Rev.G.M. Ophoff’s eminent review series on the same in Volume 10 of The Standard Bearer. To these we may add Boettner’s ‘The Person of Christ,’, B.B. Warfield’s ‘The Plan of Salvation,’ and ‘Calvin and Calvinism’ (see The Standard Bearer, Vol.31, p.390).

Also rather interesting is G.S. Bishop’s ‘Doctrines of Grace’ containing an interesting chapter on the Hebrew vowel points, Predestination, Election, Reprobation, and a chapter on Arminius, ‘False to His Trust’. Still quite up-to-date is J.Gresham Machen’s ‘Christianity and Liberalism’ (and still to this day! -cjt). In fact, all of Machen’s books are stimulating and thought-provoking.

In this lighter but edifying vein is the outstanding autobiography of that Westminster Shorter Catechism Christian, ‘John G. Paton, Missionary to the New Hebrides’ (Revell) – a book for all the family by a Reformed Presbyterian. A very engrossing and inspiring book in the field of Church history is John Fox’s ‘Book of Martyrs’ (Winston). The squeamish may not care to read the entire book, but should at least read extensively in it, if not exhaustively. So should all who are ‘signs-of-the-times’-minded.

Why reference this list of old books by these writers of a previous generation? Because some of these are classics which ought to be read by each generation. Further, because these are solid Reformed works which will increase your knowledge of the Reformed faith. And still more, because it shows that you and I ought to read widely – not just PRC works by PRC authors (though that too, of course!), but works by a variety of Reformed authors. Such reading gives us appreciation for the breadth and depth of the Reformed faith and instills in us the ability to discern and to test everything by the Word of God.

Are you familiar with any of these older works? Why not commit to becoming some soon?! The Seminary has these titles available :)

A Library for the Young People’s Society (1) – R.C.Harbach

Rev.H.Hoekema was not the only one to suggest that our Young People’s Societies organize their own libraries. While browsing for an item for the PRC archives yesterday, I came upon  an article by Rev.Robert C. Harbach in the Beacon Lights encouraging each YP’s Society to start its own library. And while he was convinced that such a beginning library should have “the fundamentals” of the Christian faith in it, he believed the fundamental principle on which this library should be based is the absolute sovereignty of God. Thus it would be a  Reformed library. And Rev.Harbach gave some practical suggestions for what books to begin to place in such a library too.

YPsLibraryI would like to see the YP’s Societies revive this idea. Perhaps by quoting from this article today we can stimulate some conversation – and then some action – on this matter! Here are some of the thoughts of Rev.R.Harbach on this:

…Somewhere in this organizational scheme (for the YP’s Society in general -cjt) there should be place and space for a Young People’s Society Library. But what sort of books should such a library have? Those which will provide us with the basic fundamentals of Christian doctrine? And furnish sound material with which to defend the fundamentals of the faith? True enough. But our experience among Fundamentalists has been that fundamentals have somehow increasingly diminished in number until there is no longer a strong barrier raised up against the non-doctrinal ‘faith’ of Modernism (And now we have, of course, the anti-doctrinal “faith” of post-modernism – cjt.).

…Now, defending and propogating the fundamentals is a good place to begin. We ought, however, to go on from there to perfection, and proclaim the whole counsel of God. For only by knowing and preaching the essentials – all the counsel of God – can we avoid the (un)conscious error of some who would be fundamental, but nevertheless for one regrettable reason or other actually neglect the most basic fundamentals. I refer to the truth of God’s absolute sovereignty. Only by holding, defending and proclaiming that truth can we hope to grow and abide in it.

Therefore it will be well to have a suitable supply of Reformed books. However, we must keep in mind that not all are Reformed that are of the Reformed distinction. For there are books with rather imposing, even singular titles, but which are nonetheless misleading; because the contents are not always of the calibre the title would indicate.

Rev.Harbach then goes on to make some concrete, practical suggestions for the kind of Reformed books a YP’s Society library might include. We will save that for next time.

Encouraging the Next Generation to Read (8)

HuizingaBrianToday we complete our posts based on the series of articles on reading found in The Standard Bearer (Dec.2013-Jan. 2014) and penned by Rev.Brian Huizinga, pastor of Hope PRC in Redlands, CA (For the previous installment, go here.). These articles are the text of an inspiring speech Rev.Huizinga gave at the annual RFPA meeting in September of 2013.

In the Jan.1, 2014 issue of the “SB” Rev.Huizinga gets into the practical points he presented in his speech. He lists ten “P’s”to encourage the younger generation to read. In today’s post we will finish going through these, giving you the last two points (“P’s”). I hope that these points will help all of us – but especially the “next generation” – to read!

RFPA2013Annual-AdPic

9. Encourage Pen and Pencil

Writing in the book or on something else helps one digest and remember what he read.  In many places the tablet is replacing the book, and I do not know if you can highlight things in a tablet.  But if you have a book, as long as it is your own, get a pen and pencil and write in it.  Underline, put exclamation marks, see page 47, stars, asterisks, notes.  Interact with your book, your magazine, young man, young woman.  If it is yours—pen and pencil.

 

10.   Emphasize the Parental Mandate

The parental mandate is not:  “You ought to read.”  Or : “I strongly encourage you to do some reading.”  The parental mandate is:  “You shall read.  I am your father.  I have been given authority by God.  This is my house.  You, son, you, daughter, shall read.”

Why would we not do this?  The two-year-old is not so excited about sitting through another hour-and-a-half long worship service on Sunday.  But “you shall come to church.”  And over the course of time children begin to see the wisdom of their parents and they enjoy going to church.  And to the young people, we have said, “You shall be home at (whatever time—11 p.m.),” and though they may object, they grow up and they say, “That was the wisdom of my parents—that curfew.”  The young woman wants to go out and even go to church in that little skirt, and father says, “You may not go to church wearing that.”  It is an argument now.  But, over time, she realizes she was foolish.  She sees the wisdom of her father.

“You shall read.”

Now, do not come to the young person with both hands full, a book in one hand, and a whip in the other, like that of one of Pharaoh’s servants:  YOU SHALL READ!  Not that kind of “shall.”  You come with a book for your son in one hand, and a book for yourself in the other.  You read, son, and I also shall read.  Then discuss the books.  The parental mandate must be given in the right attitude and spirit, surrounded by the right conduct and life, and then God will transform the “I must read” in them, into “I want to read,” and even into “I am privileged to read.”

“But dad, you don’t know how busy I am.  I can’t even read all of the books I have to read for college.  I don’t have time to read.”  Well, we know that is not true because we were all there one day.  Nor is it true when the patient responds to the dentist’s, “It doesn’t appear that you have been flossing every day,” with, “I don’t have time to floss every day.”  The dentist does not even take the time to say, “You don’t have time to run a piece of string through your teeth for sixty seconds a day?  You can do that while staring at your television.”  You have time to read.  It is a matter of the will.  “I am your father, and I love you, and now let’s start prioritizing.  For starters, you’ve got to turn that thing off, put it away, unplug it, put it way over there.  Now, we’re going to read.”  Sunday afternoon, what are you going to do this afternoon?  Here is this literature.  You shall read.

We parents, in love, need to exercise and enforce the parental mandate, “You shall read.”

By the grace of God in Jesus Christ wherein is the “will” and the “to do” of His good pleasure, and for the glory of Jehovah and His covenant, let us press on now lest a generation arise among us not knowing the Lord nor the works that He has done for Israel.  Let us lay this upon the hearts of the young people.  Read!

Where do you sit at the table?  Where do the young people sit at the table?  Where will the next generation sit at the table?  This is not a parable.  Jesus will not chide you for pressing toward the highest seat at the wedding table as He did the Pharisees.  Take your seat in position number one.  Devour good books.  And let it be the joy and rejoicing of your heart.  May God bring the children to sit with you.

Encouraging the Next Generation to Read (7) – Rev.B.Huizinga

HuizingaBrianAs I return to blogging on this Thursday (I wanted to yesterday, but it was a busy “catch up” day!), we continue our posts from the series of articles on reading found in The Standard Bearer (Dec.2013-Jan. 2014) and penned by Rev.Brian Huizinga, pastor of Hope PRC in Redlands, CA (For the previous installment, go here.). These articles are the text of an inspiring speech Rev.Huizinga gave at the annual RFPA meeting in September of 2013.

In the Jan.1, 2014 issue of the “SB” Rev.Huizinga gets into the practical points he presented in his speech. He lists ten “P’s” to encourage the younger generation to read. In today’s post we will continue going through these, giving you the next two points (“P’s”). I hope that these points will help all of us – but especially the “next generation” – to read!

7.Encourage Perseverance

    A young man or woman is reading a good book or magazine, but over the course of a few weeks wearies and discontinues.  How much it would help if one person, just one person, said, “Hey, I see you are reading that book.  Good job.  That is a great book.  Keep going.”  Sometimes with half a mile to go in a 5k, all the weary runner needs is one person to shout out some encouraging words, “Keep pushing.  You are looking great.  You are so close!”  Why not with reading also?  How easy.  How simple.  How many times have we missed an opportunity to encourage a young person to persevere?  Only a few words could make a significant difference.

RFPA2013Annual-AdPic

8.Promote Literature and the Reading of it

    Lately, the RFPA, and, for example, the staff of the Beacon Lights have been doing a terrific job promoting literature: new designs and little cards getting information out to the people, and other techniques.  That is not enough.  We need to promote it as well.  We need to do everything we can.  Parents, catechism teachers, elders on family visitation, school teachers, leaders of young people’s societies, the chaperones at the Young People’s Convention—400 young people right there for one week.  Promote literature in your cabin.  Talk about reading.  Promote, promote, promote.

Mystery Photo #3 Solved!

Last week Thursday’s mystery photo was fairly well-solved after just a few days, as you will tell from the comments. A few of you responded via email privately, but by the time those who guessed were done, the picture and place were identified. The only thing that needed correcting was the ministers who spoke at this PRYP’s Convention.

MysteryPhoto#3

The picture was of the young people of South Holland (IL) PRC (now Crete, IL PRC), the society which sponsored and hosted the 1978 YP’s Convention, held in Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. Some of you saw yourselves and therefore were able to identify quite a few of your fellow young people. Having served in SH PRC, I could pick out most of this crowd too – though they sure looked different then than when I first met them in 1989! Prominent in that front row (to the right) was a much younger Rev.David Engelsma (who could mistake that big head of hair?!).

And no, pastor Engelsma was NOT one of the speakers that year. The ministers who spoke were Revs.J.Kortering, H.Veldman, and A.den Hartog.

I made the passing comment in that post that this (1978) was a good year. That “mystery” is that my wife and I did not attend that YP’s Convention because we were married on August 31, 1978 that year, 35 years ago last year. But we had been to many Conventions before that. And though we did not go to again as conventioneers, we did get in on a few more as chaperones. Good memories. May God continue to bless our young people and this wonderful annual event.

Do you know where this year’s convention is? Check it out, here!

Encouraging the Next Generation to Read (6) – Rev.B.Huizinga

HuizingaBrianToday we also continue to post from the series of articles on reading found in The Standard Bearer (Dec.2013-Jan. 2014) and penned by Rev.Brian Huizinga, pastor of Hope PRC in Redlands, CA (For the previous installment, go here.). These articles are the text of an inspiring speech Rev.Huizinga gave at the annual RFPA meeting in September of 2013.

In the Jan.1, 2014 issue of the “SB” Rev.Huizinga gets into the practical points he presented in his speech. He lists ten “P’s” to encourage the younger generation to read. In today’s post we will continue going through these, giving you the next two points (“P’s”). I hope that these points will help all of us – but especially the “next generation” – to read!

5. Encourage Peer-Paraphrasing:

The young person has made it through a book or an article.  Do not stop there.  Now encourage them to take what they have read and paraphrase it, put it in their own words.  Paraphrase the chapter, the article, the book.  Paraphrase to peers.  This is different than partnering.  In partnering you read the same book.  With peer-paraphrasing, you paraphrase what you read to a peer—a spouse, a friend, a coworker.  That might spark an interest in them and get them to read.  But it also helps you think more deeply about what you read.  This will force us and our young people to read carefully when we do read.  And this will be a way to continue benefiting from the book after it has been read.

How about this?  Your peers are your family members.  All the children are required to read.  Now take one night a week, Wednesday night right after supper, Saturday night, Sunday afternoon, with the whole family together.  Each person gets a couple minutes to paraphrase to their peers what they have read.  There will be mutual rewards, enriching the experience of all.

RFPA2013Annual-AdPic6. Encourage Portioning

Look at that big book sitting there.  It was written by a professor of theology, by John Calvin or Abraham Kuyper.  It has 300 pages.  I cannot read it.  It is too daunting.  Encourage portioning.  You do not have to read the whole book at once, or even a whole chapter at once, but read from heading to heading.  You do not have to read the whole Standard Bearer at once, but read one article at a time.  The man sitting in seat one at the table does not eat the whole piece of meat in one bite, but he breaks it up into manageable, bite-size pieces and over the course of time devours the whole meal.  There it is, sitting on the shelf.  It was given to me at my confession of faith:  For Thy Truth’s Sake (available here -cjt).  It is huge!  Portions, portions.  Encourage the young people to take a book and divide it into manageable, bite-size portions.

PRC Mystery Photo #3

YPsConvBookletOn this “PRC archive Thursday” we bring you another mystery photo, from a little later period this time, more from my own era (and that’s the only hint you will receive!). The picture is out of a PR Young People’s Convention booklet (on your left, so you actually get two hints, as the theme of this convention is here) and a bit grainy, but that just adds to the mystery (Ah, that was a good year!). I believe you will be able to make out some of these people, at least if you are in the right church :).

What we need to know is, What YP’s Society is this? What year did they host this YP’s Convention? Where was it held that year? And, how about, who were the speakers?

Of course, if you can pinpoint some of these people in the picture, that would be a plus. Who knows, you might even find yourself! But you had to belong to the right church :) Remember to click on the picture to enlarge it.

MysteryPhoto#3

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 466 other followers