Family Worship: Read, Pray, and Sing – D.Whitney

family-worship-whitney-2016In the last few months we began to exam a new publication of Crossway that I requested for review. The book is Donald S. Whitney’s Family Worship (2016, 80 pp.), and after tracing the history of family worship (to inspire us to continue a long-standing tradition!), the author takes us into the elements of family worship in chapter three.

Whitney gives to this chapter the title that covers the three main elements of worship in our homes: read, pray, and sing. Allow me to give you a few of his brief but beneficial points in this section (pp.44-51).

First, about reading the Bible, he says:

Chapter by chapter, read through the books of the Bible together. The younger the children, the more you will want to use narrative passages and read shorter sections. As the children get older, set a goal to read through the entire New Testament, and later through the entire Bible.

Read enthusiastically and interpretively. In other words, don’t be one of those people who reads the Bible as apathetically as if reading a phone directory out loud. It is the Word of God – read it to the best of your ability.

Also, explain any words the children may not understand. Clarify the meaning of key verses. To improve their understanding, perhaps ask the children to choose a verse or phrase to explain to you, and then have them pick one for you to explain to them.

Second, about praying, Whitney offers this good idea:

    Some families, regardless of where they were reading in the Bible, always go to the book of Psalms when it’s time to pray and turn the words of a few verses there into a prayer. If praying through Psalm 23, for instance, after reading the first verse you might thank the Lord for being your Shepherd, ask him to shepherd your family through certain events or decisions, and so forth. And as you have time, continue through the passage line by line, speaking to God about what comes to mind while reading the text.

And, thirdly, concerning singing, he writes in part:

    Some people sing a different song each time; some sing the same song for a week so that they can learn it. As to music, some families sing along with recordings, while others use family musicians. My perception is that most families – even when it’s only a husband and wife – simply sing without accompaniment.

One more thing of profit I want to reference yet from this chapter. Toward the end of this chapter, Whitney has a section headed by “If Time Permits…”, and here he speaks of time for three other things during family devotions: catechizing (yes, how practical and profitable is this?!), memorizing Scripture (again, a great opportunity to do this!), and reading other books.

Yes, not surprisingly, that last is the one I want to key in on:

Again, time permitting, you might begin your family gathering with some general family reading, after which you enter family worship. Or, at the close of family worship, you might take advantage of the opportunity to read a Christian book or biography to your family.

You’re probably aware of studies which demonstrate the many benefits received by the children whose parents read to them. For many families, there’s no easier way to ensure a family reading time than by attaching it to another daily event for everyone in the household: family worship.

How is your practice of family worship going? Are you reading, praying, and singing together?

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