William Tyndale: Neglected Reformer

One of the Reformation’s often forgotten and neglected leaders is William Tyndale (1494-1536), the English theologian, linguist, and martyr through whom God gave us the first major English Bible. This forgetfulness and neglect of Tyndale is being remedied by several new works on the man and his work.

tyndale-teemsRecently, Steven Lawson has written a fine book on him under the title The Daring Mission of William Tyndale (Reformation Trust, 2014). Another title I recently purchased for the Seminary library (and in Kindle format for $.99) is David Teems’ Tyndale:the Man Who Gave God an English Voice (Thomas Nelson, 2012). I am currently reading this title and it is a very good read.

Allow me to give you a taste of Teems’ portrayal of Tyndale and his translating work on the Bible:

He is always moving. He has little choice. The threat level suspends between orange and red. The heat is never off. He is nomadic. And as we might expect, his work reflects this condition. …Tyndale must think and write while on the run. His text, therefore, has a modern economy and a pace that moves it along evenly. And though he is neither truculent nor combative by nature, he is not afraid to strike when that is all that is left to him, when the bullies rant.

Even his Englishing of the Scriptures has something to tell us. To William Tyndale, the Word of God is a living thing. It has both warmth and intellect. It has discretion, generosity, subtlety, movement, authority. It has a heart and a pulse. It keeps a beat and has a musical voice that allows it to sing. It enchants and it soothes. It argues and it forgives. It defends and it reasons. It intoxicates and it restores. It weeps and it exults. It thunders but never roars. It calls but never begs. And it always loves. Indeed, for Tyndale, love is the code that unlocks and empowers the Scripture. His inquiry into Scripture is always relational, never analytic.

img_0346Also recently, this post on Tyndale was made by Timothy Paul Jones. Here is part of the introduction. You will also find an interesting video presentation on the man and his significance at the link below.

On October 6, 1536, William Tyndale was burned at the stake. He was only forty-two years old or so at the time, but the work he had already accomplished in those four decades of life would change the world. You’ve probably seen the bumper sticker: “If you can read, thank a teacher.” Another bumper sticker—or Bible sticker, perhaps—would be every bit as appropriate: “If you can read the Bible in English, thank William Tyndale.”

After graduating from Oxford University and studying at Cambridge University, William Tyndale became a chaplain and tutor for a wealthy family. One evening, a visiting priest challenged Tyndale’s interpretation of a difficult text. During the debate, the priest declared his perspective on the value of Scripture.

“We had better be without God’s law than the pope’s,” the priest said—in other words, “It would be better to be without God’s law than to be without the pope’s law.”

“If God spares my life,” William Tyndale retorted, “I will cause a boy that driveth the plow to know more of the Scripture than you do.”

Source: Church History: How William Tyndale Changed the World – Timothy Paul Jones

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2 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. It was the life of William Tyndale that inspired me to begin a Bible collection of ancient Bibles. Now at the Dunham Bible Museum at Houston Baptist University. Plan to visit: https://www.facebook.com/DunhamBibleMusuem?ref=hl#

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    • Thanks, John. And VERY thankful you were so inspired. What an amazing collection!

      Like


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