Teaching Our Children About Work – Rev. A. denHartog

The latest issue of the Standard Bearer (March 1, 2017) is once again filled with interesting, instructive, and challenging articles. And one of them provides a good follow up to yesterday’s post about a new book on the Bible’s teaching about work.

SB-Mar1-2017-cover

As you will see from the table of contents on the cover, under the rubric “When Thou Sittest in Thine House” (taken from the title of a devotional work on the Christian family by Abraham Kuyper), Rev. Arie denHartog writes a second installment on “Teaching Our Covenant Children about Work.” In it he touches on a number of aspects that this instruction ought to take, from the example of our own work as parents to giving our children responsibilities and chores to do in the home to helping them do their homework well.

I also appreciated the emphasis in this section of his article:

Training in the home must encourage our children to develop their God-given skills and talents in the days of their youth. This will enrich the lives of our children and also prepare them for their broader calling in life in the church and in Christian society. A significant example of this is training our children in musical skills, perhaps in playing a musical instrument or developing the gift of singing. What a blessing it is for the Christian home when children have been trained to accompany and support singing at the piano or organ or with other musical instrument! Such training will manifest the Christian joy of the home mentioned by Paul in Colossians 3: 16. “Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly in all wisdom: teaching and admonishing one another in psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, singing with grace in your hearts to the Lord.”

And, as you might guess, I also support the encouragement about reading in this paragraph:

Foundational to such a broader perspective on life is reading. Parents do well for their children’s future when they instill an eager interest in reading at a young age. This too, of course, must always have spiritual perspective. Guiding our children to read good books including directly Christian books, is so very important. In most cases the leaders in the church among us must be well read in sound doctrinal books. That begins in our homes. We must train the future church leaders in our covenant homes. Theological study and discussion helps greatly to accomplish this purpose.

Are you and I teaching our children (and grandchildren) about work in these ways?