Now Batting: 14 New Baseball Books – The New York Times

Yes, it is the opening week of the Major League baseball season (in the U.S.)! And the now universally lovable winners – World Series champion Chicago Cubs – are set to defend their title (last night’s 2-1 game was a model victory – great pitching, superb defense, and timely hitting!)!

And it is Spring break week. So, we are going to have a mid-week breather from our usual fare and serve you the great American pastime – in books!

Just in time for the start of the season, The New York Times served up a menu of fourteen new baseball books, one of which is about the surprising turn-around of the Cubbies, featured at the beginning of this article by Daniel Gold. Whether that title becomes my summer baseball read or not (and there are several others out there on the Cubs’ amazing 2016 season, as you might guess, including some wonderful photo books),  there are good-looking baseball books here for all the die-hard fans.

Check out the books by browsing the article by Gold, the opening paragraph of which I quote below (click on the link with the image above for the full article and all the books).

Happy Spring! Whatever your hometown team is, have a great season! And yes, of course, Go Cubbies!

It happens every spring. It’s time to play ball, so publishers fill out a new lineup card of biographies, team histories and other baseball scholarship. This season must begin by acknowledging the surreality that after 108 years, the Chicago Cubs are again World Series champions. “The Plan” (Triumph, $24.95), by David Kaplan, is a chronicle of the project to turn “one of the worst organizations in baseball” into “a dynasty in the making.” Kaplan starts with the 2009 purchase of the franchise by Tom Ricketts, and the subsequent wooing of Theo Epstein, the general manager behind two titles for the formerly cursed Boston Red Sox. Chicago’s farm system is stocked and Joe Maddon, the Tampa Bay Rays manager, is signed ahead of the 2015 season. Add youngsters like Kris Bryant and Kyle Schwarber, and free agents like Jon Lester, and a long-losing club is finally No. 1. There’s too much front-office esoterica — one appendix lists clauses from rooftop-seating contracts for buildings around Wrigley Field — but Cubs fans won’t mind.

Published in: on April 5, 2017 at 6:37 AM  Leave a Comment