Have You Ever Heard These 25 Obscure English Words?

As we have started a new month and have not had a “Word Wednesday” in a while, let’s make use of this one from GrammarBook.com, which came into my email box back in January. Instead of one word, however, you will get to consider 25! And, yes, these are truly obscure, and maybe a tad strange – I only knew a few – but look at the vocabulary you will add to your speech! Well, maybe not.

I include the introduction and the first part of the list – enjoy!

There’s something so satisfying about pulling out a $15 word—the kind that you hardly ever get to use, but fits the situation perfectly. On the other hand, that feeling when you can’t quite find the right word for what you’re trying to express is incredibly aggravating. Well, we’re here to help. Here are 25 weird, obscure, and downright cool words hidden in the English language.

For the rest, visit the link below.

Source: Have You Ever Heard These 25 Obscure English Words? |

Epeolatry: The worship of words. What better piece of vocabulary to kick off this list with?
Aglet: The little piece of plastic on the end of your shoelaces. (Crossword puzzle fans know this one.)
Grawlix: You know when cartoonists substitute a bunch of punctuation marks for curse words? They’re using grawlix.
Borborygmus: A rumbling in your stomach. Time for lunch!
Accubation: While you quell your borborygmus, you might engage in accubation—the act of comfortably reclining, often during a meal.
Jillick: To skip a stone across a surface of water.
Nibling: Here’s a handy word you might just now realize you were missing. Nibling is a gender-neutral term for a niece or nephew.
Tatterdemalion: Some words just sound like their meaning. A tatterdemalion is somebody wearing tattered clothing. It can also be used as an adjective meaning tattered or ragged in appearance.
Tittle: The word tittle has got just one tittle in it, but this sentence has six—no, seven—more. It’s the little dot above a lowercase j or i.
Pogonotrophy: You probably know someone who engages in pogonotrophy, the act of growing a beard, even if they don’t call it that.
Pilgarlic: On the opposite end of the spectrum, a pilgarlic is a bald-headed person—usually one you’re mocking or feeling sorry for.
Published in: on March 13, 2019 at 10:58 PM  Leave a Comment